“This book tells you all you need to know about how to get on.” The Times

“Relatively few books have been written with assistant solicitors in mind, about how to succeed at the business of being a lawyer… fewer still have devised a programme for so doing that runs alongside a book. This book does both.”Law Society (The Law Management Section)

5 star rating HR Magazine

A new year to begin your networking NOW

In one of my December posts, I suggested that the holidays were a good time to network.  With the holidays now over, especially if you didn’t use that time as a networking opportunity, I urge you to begin the new year with a networking goal.  With this in mind, I’m going to use this month’s blog posts to give you a few networking tips.  My first tip is this: commit to the success of others.

An effective network is contingent on the success of each person within the group. As other individuals in your circle become more successful, they not only extend their power and influence, but also their chances of being able to help you. . . In short, by boosting the careers of others, you probably increase the likelihood of gaining your own rewards.  (This is what I call the Elevator Mission: Lift people up emotionally and they will in return appreciate you.  Well, it’s also important to lift people up professionally—they will probably lift you up in return).

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Lead through relationships

I was presenting at a law firm retreat this week.  After my discussion on leadership one lawyer said to me, “You obviously think leadership is all about relationships.”  Well, she had clearly been listening because I believe relationships are key for effective leadership and this had, not unnaturally, been the main point of my talk.  I’ve learned to emphasize this point because so many lawyers believe that it’s their thinking and their persuasive abilities that enhance leadership prospects.  In actuality, it’s your relationships that make you a leader—or not. 

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Teach and build a relationship

Frankly, don’t you often find it easier just to do something yourself rather than delegating—especially if you have to spend time teaching the other person how to do it?

The old proverb about teaching someone to fish may be true, but sometimes it’s actually the harder option. All the same, in the long run, it might still be the best choice: because it not only makes you more efficient, but also helps you to build relationships.

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