“This book tells you all you need to know about how to get on.” The Times

“Relatively few books have been written with assistant solicitors in mind, about how to succeed at the business of being a lawyer… fewer still have devised a programme for so doing that runs alongside a book. This book does both.”Law Society (The Law Management Section)

5 star rating HR Magazine

The Big 3 (brand, business & leadership) Blog

Networking tip 4: Find common interests

We are all constantly looking for connections and common interests. When we do find them, we create associations, camaraderie, and friendships—and, of course, we expand our personal network.

Create a Bond

Finding things in common can be so simple! Sometimes even one shared experience will do. (“Hang on. Weren’t you at that appalling conference in Toronto where . . .?”) In fact, sometimes a single incident can create a lasting bond. I have a former client, Owen, with whom I negotiated a deal in meetings that went on until dawn. When I run into him today, he always teasingly introduces me as the “the lady lawyer with whom he once spent the night.” By telling that story, Owen makes me feel more like a friend with a shared past than a legal advisor! 

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Networking tip 3: Connect people with people

Today’s tip is again short and sweet:  build your network by connecting other people.

One of the keys to helping others within your network is to bring people together for their mutual benefit. This is what networking is all about, and the results typically achieve more than any other act of generosity. As a credible source making an introduction, you automatically generate trust between the people you bring together, and they’re able to commence a beneficial relationship with confidence—feeling gratitude toward you as well.

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Networking tip 2: Share your knowledge

Following on from my last post, I am continuing my new year’s networking tips.  Today’s tip is short and sweet:  share your knowledge (for free!).

Every lawyer possesses information that would be valuable to others in his immediate network. Never underestimate the value of your knowledge, and go out of your way to share it willingly. The worst mistake you can make is to treat any of your research, documents, or templates as proprietary: there will be far more benefit—both to yourself and to others—if you circulate them among clients, colleagues, and contacts. 

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A new year to begin your networking NOW

In one of my December posts, I suggested that the holidays were a good time to network.  With the holidays now over, especially if you didn’t use that time as a networking opportunity, I urge you to begin the new year with a networking goal.  With this in mind, I’m going to use this month’s blog posts to give you a few networking tips.  My first tip is this: commit to the success of others.

An effective network is contingent on the success of each person within the group. As other individuals in your circle become more successful, they not only extend their power and influence, but also their chances of being able to help you. . . In short, by boosting the careers of others, you probably increase the likelihood of gaining your own rewards.  (This is what I call the Elevator Mission: Lift people up emotionally and they will in return appreciate you.  Well, it’s also important to lift people up professionally—they will probably lift you up in return).

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A remarkable woman and example of generosity we should all emulate

On the 12th of December, my grandmother turned 98 years old.  She had a wonderful birthday surrounded by friends and family—children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren—even one soon-to-be-born great-great-grandchild, who will be her namesake.  The few of us unable to attend in person called to send our love and hear about her day.  I will always remember my grandmother then as being in great spirits, serenely joyful and full of life as we celebrated her and her place in our lives.

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